CMEMLL Conference: The English Legal Imaginary, Part II

The English Legal Imaginary, 1500-1700, Parts I and II

Part I: Princeton University, 17-18 April, 2015
Part II: University of St Andrews, 1-2 May, 2015

http://cmemll.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/files/2015/03/The-English-Legal-Imaginary-Part-I.jpghttp://cmemll.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/files/2015/03/The-English-Legal-Imaginary-Part-II.jpg

CMEMLL is delighted to announce The English Legal Imaginary, Part II, taking place in the School of English on 1-2 May, 2015.

The English Legal Imaginary, Part II is an interdisciplinary conference involving leading scholars working at the intersections of law, politics, literature and history in early modern England. The conference papers will contribute to the forthcoming Oxford Handbook of English Law and Literature, 1500-1700.

Topics include: Roman law and common law, law and drama; law and education; equity, legal reform and literary censorship.

Speakers include: Martin Butler, Bradin Cormack, Alan Cromartie, Steve Hindle; Rab Houston, Lorna Hutson, David Ibbetson, James McBain, Subha Mukherji, Joad Raymond, Carolyn Sale, James Sharpe, Erica Sheen, Quentin Skinner, Virginia Lee Strain, Elliott Visconsi, Ian Williams, Jessica Winston, and Andrew Zurcher.

The registration fees for this conference are: £30 for students and unwaged, and £40 for waged participants. This fee covers lunch and coffee/tea breaks on both days, in addition to the conference dinner on Friday 1, and the closing wine and cheese reception on Saturday 2 May. Places are limited, so early registration is important. Only those who are registered will be admitted to the conference; there are no drop-in sessions.

Please register using the following link: The English Legal Imaginary, Part II

Our Next Event: Dr William Pettigrew, The Royal African Company & the Development of the English Slave Trade, 6 March 2015

We are delighted to announce that Dr William Pettigrew, University of Kent, will present our next lecture.

Dr Pettigrew will talk to us about The Royal African Company and the Development of the English Slave Trade, c 1670-1750 to be followed by drinks.

The talk will take place on 6 March, at 6.30 pm in Birkbeck, Room 532, Malet Street. Members free (membership £7), non members £4.

You do not need to be a Birkbeck student to join the Early Modern society or attend our events.

Numbers in Early Modern Writing

‘Numbers in Early Modern Writing’, a special edition of the Journal of the Northern Renaissance is now live. Edited by Dr Katherine Hunt and Rebecca Tomlin, both members of the Birkbeck Early Modern Society, the articles in this issue explore the multiple ways in which numbers feature in early modern writing, from Robert Record to Civil War code manuals, with poetry and tragedy, fencing, accounting, and printing on the way.

Follow this link, for your profit and delight:
Journal of the Northern Renaissance Issue-6-2014

Call for Abstracts: Scholarship, Print, and Polemics in Seventeenth-Century Germany

This is a call for abstracts or extracts of book chapters that explore scholarly practice in the Holy Roman German Empire of the seventeenth century. The proposed volume is specifically interested in exploring the interactions between scholarly practice, print technology, and the polemics associated with confessionalisation and the rise of the early modern nation state. Potential contributors are encouraged to consider these interactions in the context of early modern interdisciplinarity and the correspondence networks that underpinned the Gelehrtenrepublik.

A rising interest in the early modern republic of letters is apparent in historical scholarship of the last three decades, and the last ten years in particular have seen a surge in this field. Initiatives such as the Cultures of Knowledge project at Oxford, and new journals such as Republics of Letters, sponsored by Stanford University, focus specifically on this unique world and the correspondence networks and scholarly rituals that were so crucial to its success. Nevertheless, scholarly interest in the German context, at least among Anglophone scholars, has been somewhat sporadic. English-language scholarship (particularly monographs) on the early modern republic of letters has tended towards the English and French contexts, with a gap in our understanding of how these experiences translated to and from the German lands. Alternately, one often finds the literature examining the topic with intellectual icons from the Low Countries at the centre and scholars from Germany and elsewhere cast almost at the periphery.

This volume will add to a growing body of work in the German context with contributions that explore scholarship, print, and polemics in the seventeenth-century German lands with a specific focus on the interdisciplinary practices and correspondence networks that supported them. In so doing, it is anticipated that this volume will not only add to our existing understanding of early modern scholarly practice, but will also offer different perspectives on interactions between German scholars and their international counterparts. In this light, contributions that compare and contrast the German experience with the broader seventeenth-century republic of letters, and/or which contextualise their analyses in this context, are strongly encouraged.

Abstracts may be up to one page in length, and final chapters should be between 6,000 and 8,000 words, including notes.

Please submit abstracts, extracts, or drafts to the editor, Christian Thorsten Callisen, via email (christian@callisen.net.au) by 31 March 2015. Successful submissions will inform a book proposal for consideration in Brill’s Studies in Intellectual History. It is anticipated that completed drafts of chapters will be required by the end of February 2016, with revisions to be completed thereafter, though final deadlines will be confirmed.

Christian Thorsten Callisen is based in Brisbane, Australia. His research focuses on interdisciplinary scholarship and the dissemination of ideas in early modern Europe. His work has appeared in the Journal of the History of Ideas and he is editor of Reading and Writing History from Bruni to Windschuttle: Essays in Honour of Gary Ianziti (Ashgate, 2014).

Our Next Event: Simon Smith, Hearing, Seeing and Feeling Music in the Early Modern Playhouse

6 February 2015, Dr Simon Smith, University of Oxford, Hearing, Seeing and Feeling Music in the Early Modern Playhouse, Room B18, Malet Street, 6.30 pm

We are delighted to be able to welcome our former committee member, Dr Simon Smith, back to Birkbeck to give our next lecture.

Dr Simon Smith did his PhD at Birkbeck. His thesis title is ‘Musical response in the early modern playhouse, 1603-1625′. He is now a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow in the Faculty of English, University of Oxford, and Junior Research Fellow of The Queen’s College, Oxford.

This topic should be of interest to anyone who has seen a play by Shakespeare or other early modern dramatist and wondered about the music.  So if you know someone who would be interested in this fascinating topic then please pass this message to them or just bring them along. You do not need to be a Birkbeck student to join the Early Modern society or attend our events.
Unless otherwise specified the charge for each event is: members free (membership £7), non-members £4, donations welcome.

For details of  our aims and events please see http://www.bbk.ac.uk/history/about-us/societies-student-groups/early-modern-society

Birkbeck Early Modern Society