Who were the Nuns? A Prosopographical study of the English Convents in exile 1600-1800

Who were the Nuns? A Prosopographical study of the English Convents in exile 1600-1800

Since September 2008, the Arts and Humanities Research Council funded project team at Queen Mary has been making a comprehensive study of the membership of the English convents in exile. That is, the period between the opening of the first English convent in Brussels to the nuns’ return to England as a result of the French Revolution and associated violence. Most were enclosed convents, in theory cut off from the outside world. However in practice the nuns were not isolated and their contacts and networks spread widely.

As well as studying the members and their families the project is collecting data on sponsors and patrons on both sides of the Channel.

This website will provide a range of materials for the history of the convents, including edited texts as they are finished and ultimately a fully searchable database of members.

Visit the homepage at http://www.history.qmul.ac.uk/wwtn/index.html for more information about the project. And see http://www.history.qmul.ac.uk/wwtn/links.html for some links to monastic connections.

On 29 June 2010 Dr Caroline Bowden, project manager, Dr Katharine Keats-Rohan, research fellow, and Dr Katrien Daemen DeGelder, research officer, will be giving a joint paper at the Institute of Historical Research’s ‘Religious History of Britain 1500-1800’ seminar entitled ‘Free Will and Enclosure: Recruitment and Motivation in the English Convents in Exile 1600-1700’. (International Relations Room, IHR, 5 pm)

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