Early Modern Lectures at the Museum of London, October-November 2011

The Museum of London and Gresham College will be presenting lectures of early modern interest this autumn. For full details see the Gresham College Events Page

The End of the Old World Order, 1530 to 1650
Dr Simon Thurley

Monday, 10 October 2011 – 6:00pm
Museum of London

The Reformation and the Civil War, two events a century apart, created an astonishing originality and independence in English Building.

This is a part of the lecture series From Architectural Periphery to the World’s Engine House: English Building from the Reformation to the First World War.

In this series of lectures Simon Thurley continues his investigation into the history of building in England. Starting with the shattering events of the Suppression of the Monasteries and the Civil War he moves on to look at the architectural consensus that briefly reigned in the mid eighteenth century before it dissolved in the white heat of the Industrial Revolution. Economic and technological change then drove English building in remarkable new directions for over 150 years. This period was ended by another shattering event, but this time of global proportions – the First World War. This extraordinary chronicle is not just history of architecture, but the history of an ascendant civilization.

Literature and Politics in Seventeenth Century London
Dr Anna Beer

Wednesday, 12 October 2011 – 6:00pm
Museum of London

The contrasting, but interconnected, experiences of two writers: Sir Walter Ralegh and John Milton.

Ralegh was a prisoner in the Tower of London between 1603 and 1616, where he wrote a number of works including the monumental (and unfinished) The History of the World.

Milton spent most of his working life in the City of London, whether as a prolific writer of political pamphlets or hiding in fear of his life at the Restoration of Charles II.

The lecture will illuminate the London communities that radicalised each man and reveal the networks that enabled their political thinking to reach its audience, set against the backdrop of a wider transformation in political culture; the move from manuscript to print and the explosion of publications when censorship was relaxed in 1640.

What can we learn from this interplay between politics and print as we experience our own internet revolution?

This lecture is being held in association with the Fulbright Commission

The Rise of Consensus, 1650 to 1760
Dr Simon Thurley
Wednesday, 2 November 2011 – 6:00pm
Museum of London

Opened up to the world once more England drank in influences and ideas from abroad which were to infuse English building with widely held ideas and values.

This is a part of the lecture series From Architectural Periphery to the World’s Engine House: English Building from the Reformation to the First World War.

In this lecture series Simon Thurley continues his investigation into the history of building in England. Starting with the shattering events of the Suppression of the Monasteries and the Civil War he moves on to look at the architectural consensus that briefly reigned in the mid eighteenth century before it dissolved in the white heat of the Industrial Revolution. Economic and technological change then drove English building in remarkable new directions for over 150 years. This period was ended by another shattering event, but this time of global proportions – the First World War. This extraordinary chronicle is not just history of architecture, but the history of an ascendant civilization.

Thanks to Robin Rowles for these!

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